Thresholds Explained
Critical Swim Pace (CSP)

The upper threshold or also called anaerobic threshold (AT) marks the exercise intensity where muscle lactate production exceeds the removal of the same due to oxygen demand surpassing supply. As exercise intensifies, aerobic metabolism may fall short, prompting increased reliance on anaerobic pathways. When lactate production exceeds the removal of the same it is leading to its accumulation in the blood, associated with muscle fatigue and reduced performance.

Enter the data for one of the following options, if known to represent your CSP:

- The latest swim test result
- The avg. pace per 100m or 100yd you can maintain over a distance of 1000m or more without experiencing significant fatigue.

If you do not know your critical swim pace or have difficulties to estimate it, we will set a value of 02:00min/100m (or yards) and will plan a swim test as soon as possible.

Upper Threshold (Heart Rate - bpm)

The upper threshold or also called anaerobic threshold (AT) marks the exercise intensity where muscle lactate production exceeds the removal of the same due to oxygen demand surpassing supply. As exercise intensifies, aerobic metabolism may fall short, prompting increased reliance on anaerobic pathways. When lactate production exceeds the removal of the same it is leading to its accumulation in the blood, associated with muscle fatigue and reduced performance.

Enter the data for one of the following options if known, to define your upper threshold:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.
- The avg. heart rate of the middle 10-minute segment of a recently done 20-minute run test (all out field test).
- The avg. heart rate of a run (between 5-10k) that was performed as fast as possible.

In cases where such data is not available, we estimated it by adding 35 BPM to the lower threshold.

Lower Threshold (Heart Rate - bpm)

The lower threshold or also called aerobic threshold refers to the point during exercise where the body shifts from predominantly aerobic energy production to a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. It represents the exercise intensity at which the aerobic system is fully able to meet the body's energy demands without relying significantly on anaerobic pathways. During a lactat-test in the lab it refers to the point where blood lactate is rising for the first time.

Enter the data for one of the following options, if known:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

- The avg. heart rate of a run (longer then 5k) that was performed on a low intenstiy, that you think you can hold "forever".

In cases where such data is not available, we estimated it by conductiong the Phil Maffetone methode and that is the resulting value you see here.

Upper Threshold (Pace - min/km)

The upper threshold or also called anaerobic threshold (AT) marks the exercise intensity where muscle lactate production exceeds the removal of the same due to oxygen demand surpassing supply. As exercise intensifies, aerobic metabolism may fall short, prompting increased reliance on anaerobic pathways. When lactate production exceeds the removal of the same it is leading to its accumulation in the blood, associated with muscle fatigue and reduced performance.

Enter the data for one of the following options, if known:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

- The avg. pace of the middle 10-minute segment of a recently done 20-minute run test (all out field test), that you then make 5% slower.

- The avg. pace of a 10k run that was performed as fast as possible.

- The avg. pace of a 5k run that was performed as fas as possible and then slowed down by 15s.

- The avg. pace of a 21.1k run that was performed as fast as possible and then made faster by 15s.

In cases where all that options are not a valid solutions we recommend starting off with a rough estimation of  06:00min/km and we make a performance test as soon as possible with you.

Lower Threshold (Pace - min/km)

The lower threshold or also called aerobic threshold refers to the point during exercise where the body shifts from predominantly aerobic energy production to a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. It represents the exercise intensity at which the aerobic system is fully able to meet the body's energy demands without relying significantly on anaerobic pathways. During a lactat-test in the lab it refers to the point where blood lactate is rising for the first time.

Enter the data for the following option, if known representing the lower threshold:

- A lab-test that represents your current fitness situation

In cases where such data is not available, we estimated it by taking the upper threshold pace and slow it down by 60s which means, that you need to increase the pace (e.g. 06:00 min/km -> 07:00 min/km).

Upper Threshold (Heart Rate - bpm)

The upper threshold or also called anaerobic threshold (AT) marks the exercise intensity where muscle lactate production exceeds the removal of the same due to oxygen demand surpassing supply. As exercise intensifies, aerobic metabolism may fall short, prompting increased reliance on anaerobic pathways. When lactate production exceeds the removal of the same it is leading to its accumulation in the blood, associated with muscle fatigue and reduced performance.

Enter the data for one of the following options, if known, to represent your upper threshold:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

- The avg. heart rate of the middle 10-minute segment of a recently done 20-minute FTP-Test.

It is the avg. In the case where such data is not available we estimate it by adding 35 BPM to the lower bike threshold value.

Lower Threshold (Heart Rate - bpm)

The lower threshold or also called aerobic threshold refers to the point during exercise where the body shifts from predominantly aerobic energy production to a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. It represents the exercise intensity at which the aerobic system is fully able to meet the body's energy demands without relying significantly on anaerobic pathways. During a lactat-test in the lab it refers to the point where blood lactate is rising for the first time.

Enter the data for the following option, if known, to represent your lower threshold:

- The data of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

In cases where such data is not available, we estimate it by taking the lower HR threshold from running and reduce it by 10 BPM.

Upper Threshold (Power - Watts)

The upper threshold or also called anaerobic threshold (AT) marks the exercise intensity where muscle lactate production exceeds the removal of the same due to oxygen demand surpassing supply. As exercise intensifies, aerobic metabolism may fall short, prompting increased reliance on anaerobic pathways. When lactate production exceeds the removal of the same it is leading to its accumulation in the blood, associated with muscle fatigue and reduced performance.

Enter the data for one of the following options, if known, that represent your upper threshold:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

- The avg. power (Watts) of the middle 10-minute segment of a recently done 20-minute FTP-Test and then reduce it by 5%.

In cases where such data is not available, we estimate it by multiplying your body weight with a factor of 3 which is based on 20 year coaching knowledge of our head coach (Mario Schmidt Wending).

Lower Threshold (Power - Watts)

The lower threshold or also called aerobic threshold refers to the point during exercise where the body shifts from predominantly aerobic energy production to a greater reliance on anaerobic metabolism. It represents the exercise intensity at which the aerobic system is fully able to meet the body's energy demands without relying significantly on anaerobic pathways. During a lactat-test in the lab it refers to the point where blood lactate is rising for the first time.

Enter the data for the following option, if known, to represent your lower threshold:

- The result of a lab-test that represents your current fitness situation.

In cases where such data is not available, we estimate it by multiplying your body weight with a factor of 2 which is based on 20 year coaching knowledge of our head coach (Mario Schmidt Wending).